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Moved on
30-May-2002, 09:28 PM
Post: #41
 
quote:

I wish you lot would stop talking about nice cold weather, it's been in the 90's here for weeks and not a drop of rain. Sorry, everything is Fahrenheit here [the deep south of the USA]. Hurricane season starts next week so maybe we'll get some rain, roll on winter, I'm sick of the heat already.
Rocketmanjohn




Sorry John, we had a lovely breeze today sunny but cool. Heaven. You were saying?
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30-May-2002, 11:55 PM
Post: #42
 
Hope you cool down soon John.We are into centigrade here and I can just about manage to convert that but still think only in feet and inches.
We've had a touch of hail ,wind ,sun and heavy rain in the last two days and a brief spell of lightning and thunder. That is in the Auckland region and all in a day.
Is your heat dry or muggy?
Auckland can be so humid in the summer and unbearable at times.Have to keep sipping the ale.
I believe Australia is even hotter although Tasmania is much more temperate.
Latest trivia from NZ.
Christchurch city wants to put up a statue of three corgis to celebrate the Queens Jubilee which hasn't met with much support from the Royal advisers.
Stay cool.
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31-May-2002, 12:33 AM
Post: #43
 
Hi Noel.The piano and certainly not The Voice.Have forgotten all I ever learned and tend to wander off the beaten track as you've probably realised.
One thing I found is that your background and things you take for granted become so important when you have MOVED AWAY.Hence the history.Many N.Zealanders still refer to England as the Old Country mostly in the South Island and the older ones.
I'm sort of split in my memories as though born in Leyland and at Balshaws 46-53 lived in Brownedge Rd, Bamber Bridge end and LH.Also Blackpool for a brief time.Didn't realise you can see the tower from Farington.Lost a bag of plums from the top of the Big Wheel yonks ago.
Sign of age to be going back.
However I think that Leyland was very much linked with the other areas. The names of Balshaws Houses include Farington and I was in Worden House. My father was born in Meanygate or Minnigate as he called it and doesn't that go right through to Leyland.
The largest ice cream factory in NZ is Tip Top.Visited there with a group and they export widely overseas not just ice cream products but cheese cakes etc.A bit like Walls in importance but I can only think of the wafers that they made.Scrumptious.
Thanks for the music site and I believe NZ Music Month is over but there is a site of a variety of NZ music http://www.amplifier.co.nz.
Haven't tried it as am only a newbie.
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31-May-2002, 04:17 PM
Post: #44
 
That's right Lady G the other 2 houses were Cuerden and Clayton. I was in Worden also blue tops , Clayton were green, Farington Yellow , Cuerden Red. Blackpool tower can be seen from the top of the 4 storey building at Leyland& Birmingham where I worked until last week, you have to be quick to view it though as it is about to be pulled down and the site used to build 400 new houses. Even when I lived down in Somerset I still had a strong urge to return home. Thankfully I did and have never regretted it though I would love to visit somewhere as beautiful and interesting as New Zealand. Maybe when I retire.
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31-May-2002, 09:08 PM
Post: #45
 
Hi, I had to think for a little while but I did eventually remember I was in Cuerden house (in Balshaws). It is great to think that Leyland has such fond memories for so many people. I only live a few miles outside Leyland (Whitestake) now but I don't often get to visit. I payed a visit to Balshaws a few years ago, it smelled just the same as it did when I was a student there! LOL
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01-Jun-2002, 12:25 AM
Post: #46
 
Don't remember the smell of Balshaws but do remember being petrified and very conscious of a new uniform.Did they stick with velour hats and panamas in the summer.Except being immediately post war they were not real panama and in the first rain the brims got wavy.
The winter headgear we used to spice up by removing the band ,cutting off at least two inches and tacking it all together again and hiding the handiwork with the band.Far more cool.
You could also make a duck in the back by pinching a fold in place.It was hard to do cos those hats were so rigid.
Got more daring as time passed however and we used to sneak out of the front door ,dip down under the Headmaster's window and run to the shop further along the road.
Things that stick in my mind.The regular reading out of the school rules at Assembly including the one about not touching strange objects even with a stick,Learning the 53rd chapter of Isaiah by heart as we all had to do it for the Head.
Learning to sing "I waited for the Lord" in parts as it was the music teacher's favourite.
Drinking illicit cider in the last Assembly for the seniors as we had graduated to the balcony from sitting on the hard floor.
Guess that's pretty tame these days.Haven't been back to visit except to look from outside.
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01-Jun-2002, 03:54 AM
Post: #47
 
Lady Griffin

Reply to:
We've had a touch of hail ,wind ,sun and heavy rain in the last two days and a brief spell of lightning and thunder. That is in the Auckland region and all in a day.
Is your heat dry or muggy?


The humidity here in New Orleans is very high. Never less than 80% and usually a lot higher, 100% most mornings. New Orleans is below sea level and is kept flood free with pumps, all the surrounding area is swamp land. These sounds a bit grim but actually is very beautiful, If you remember the Bond movie, 'Live and Let Die', it was all filmed near my home. All the boat chases were taken on Bayou Liberty and Bayou Bonfouca which is only a mile or so away, I used to go swimming a lot there 'til I found out it's the highest concentration of water mocassins [poisonous snakes] around. Change of venue.
There arent many major cities in the U.S. where one can be in the wilderness of the swamps just 20 minutes out of town. I see alligators most mornings on my way to work in East New Orleans.
Rocketmanjohn
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01-Jun-2002, 07:13 AM
Post: #48
 
No wonder you have a longing for colder weather.We have a talk back host on Radio Pacific who travels a lot.His wife is an air hostess so he can afford to.Absolutely dotes on New Orleans and talks in depth about the music, pumping system and N.O.being below sea level.Have seen the occasional American TV program set in your territory
Sounds beautiful apart from the snakes and alligators.You can have them.
Athough our cuzzie bros in OZ have snakes we don't.Any that manage to infiltrate occasionally get terminated.Sometimes Aussie red back spiders arrive uninvited and get hunted down.
See Senegal managed to pull off a great performance.Have had reports ad nauseum about Beckham's left foot.
Cheers
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09-Jun-2002, 10:19 AM
Post: #49
 
Lady G
Thank you for reminding me about rugby matches at Stonyhurst.
I attended Balshaws from 1957 to 1964 and have fond memories of school rugby. The highlight of the trip to Stonyhurst was the individual baths after the game and a dip in their swimming pool.
This was followed by a meal which included cream cakes. After most games at other schools you were lucky to be given a curly sandwich.
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13-Jun-2002, 07:54 AM
Post: #50
 
Can't remember much about those trips Brian to Stoneyhurst but you are right about the splendid food compared to the usual limp sandwiches dished up.
I do recall the refined accents alongside our broad Lanky.And I certainly remember learning a lot of choice songs to while away time on the bus trip.
One in particular was a sort of Lancashire version of Ilkley Moor Bah't 'At.
Much more mournful and the sad chorus was "How Happy We Shall Be"It involved the sad demise of a chap or chappess and the even sadder burial which followed.Typical Lanky black humour.
Stoneyhurst I visited later on a trip to see a play in Latin and they showed us a few of the treasures there.It's said that the gold cloak of Henry viii is kept there.Didn't see it though-they probably couldn't trust us.
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